The Leaning Pile of Books is a feature where I talk about books I got over the last week – old or new, bought or received for review. Since I hope you will find new books you’re interested in reading in these posts, I try to be as informative as possible. If I can find them, links to excerpts, author’s websites, and places where you can find more information on the book are included.

This week brought 2 review copies (well, technically 3 but 2 of these were the same exact book).

The Coldest War by Ian Tregillis

The Coldest War (Milkweed Triptych #2) by Ian Tregillis

This sequel to Bitter Seeds will be released on July 17 (hardcover and ebook). An excerpt from The Coldest War is available.

I still haven’t read the first volume in this series, but I may give it a try at some point since I have heard it’s really good.

In Ian Tregillis’ The Coldest War, a precarious balance of power maintains the peace between Britain and the USSR. For decades, Britain’s warlocks have been all that stands between the British Empire and the Soviet Union—a vast domain stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the shores of the English Channel. Now each wizard’s death is another blow to Britain’s national security.

Meanwhile, a brother and sister escape from a top-secret facility deep behind the Iron Curtain. Once subjects of a twisted Nazi experiment to imbue ordinary people with superhuman abilities, then prisoners of war in the immense Soviet research effort to reverse-engineer the Nazi technology, they head for England. 

Because that’s where former spy Raybould Marsh lives. And Gretel, the mad seer, has plans for him.

As Marsh is once again drawn into the world of Milkweed, he discovers that Britain’s darkest acts didn’t end with the war. And while he strives to protect queen and country, he is forced to confront his own willingness to accept victory at any cost.

Albert of Adelaide by Howard L. Anderson

Albert of Adelaide by Howard L. Anderson

This debut novel will be released on July 10 (ebook and hardcover). I’m not quite sure what to think about a fantasy novel about a duck-billed platypus, but I may give it a try at some point since it’s supposed to be rather good. Publisher’s Weekly included it on their Best Summer Books of 2012 list, included it on their summer reading list, and Mary Doria Russell (author of The Sparrow) recommends it.

At once an old-fashioned-buddy-novel-shoot-’em-up and a work of deliciously imagined fantasy, Howard L. Anderson’s dazzling debut presents the haunting story of a world where something has gone horribly awry . . .

Having escaped from Australia’s Adelaide Zoo, an orphaned platypus named Albert embarks on a journey through the outback in search of “Old Australia,” a rumored land of liberty, promise, and peace. What he will find there, however, away from the safe confinement of his enclosure for the first time since his earliest memories, proves to be a good deal more than he anticipated.

Alone in the outback, with an empty soft drink bottle as his sole possession, Albert stumbles upon pyromaniacal wombat Jack, and together they spend a night drinking and gambling in Ponsby Station, a rough-and-tumble mining town. Accused of burning down the local mercantile, the duo flees into menacing dingo territory and quickly go their separate ways-Albert to pursue his destiny in the wastelands, Jack to reconcile his past.

Encountering a motley assortment of characters along the way-a pair of invariably drunk bandicoots, a militia of kangaroos, hordes of the mercurial dingoes, and a former prize-fighting Tasmanian devil-our unlikely hero will discover a strength and skill for survival he never suspected he possessed.

Told with equal parts wit and compassion, ALBERT OF ADELAIDE shows how it is often the unexpected route, and the most improbable companions, that lead us on the path to who we really are. Who you journey with, after all, is far more important than wherever it is you are going.